1999 Press Clippings About OOCCL
PDF Print E-mail

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

The Dallas Morning News - Friday, October 8, 1999

 

 

HOME TOURS

Oak Cliff home tour: Ten historic structures open for viewing. Presented by the Old Oak Cliff Conservation League . Noon-6 p.m. Oct. 16-17. Includes homes at 1906 Marydale Drive, 2029 Mayflower Drive, 2123 Elmwood Blvd., 500 E. 5th St., 718 Woodlawn Ave., 1222 N. Clinton Ave., 1204 N. Edgefield Ave. and 1222 Belleau Ave. Also features Cliff Temple Baptist Church at 125 Sunset Ave. and J. Erik Jonsson Community School at 110 E. 10th St. Tickets $12 adults, $8 seniors, available day of show at each tour location and at the Stevens Park Golf Course Pavillion at W. Colorado Boulevard at Plymouth Road. Advance tickets $10 adults, $8 seniors, available at Bishop Arts Floral, 412 N. Bishop Ave., 214-941-8744, -941-0907, Legacy Trading Company, 2800 Routh St. in the Quadrangle, 214-953-2222, and The Urban Gardener, 305 Centre St., 214-943-6785. For tour information, call 972-606-3693, access www.clifftop.com/ooccl or e-mail at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

8 Oak Cliff neighborhoods get grants

The Dallas Morning News - Tuesday, August 10, 1999
Author: Eleska Aubespin, Staff Writer of The Dallas Morning News
Eight Oak Cliff neighborhoods have received grants to help fund projects that will improve and beautify the old Oak Cliff area.

More than $10,000 was awarded in July and will be used for street sign toppers, landscape lighting, a neighborhood directory, sidewalk ramps, street improvements and irrigation.

The Old Oak Cliff Conservation League , which was founded in 1974, is dedicated to the preservation, conservation and restoration of the area. Twenty-two Oak Cliff neighborhoods are in the league, encompassing an area bounded by Interstate 35 to the east, Interstate 30 to the north, Westmoreland Avenue to the west and Kiest Boulevard to the south, said Gary Burns, the group's president.

"These grants help bring the neighborhoods together and give residents an incentive to develop projects they can work on together," Mr. Burns said. "The league's thrust is to help preserve and enhance life in the old Oak Cliff area, so we look for projects that benefit the entire neighborhood."

It is the third year that grants have been awarded.

Winnetka Heights received $500 to publish a neighborhood directory; West Kessler received $1,700 to irrigate a cul-de-sac; Stevens Park Village got $1,220 to close a street; $1,711 was awarded to Stevens Park Estates for historic lighting; $1,000 was given to North Cliff to build sidewalk ramps; L.O. Daniel has $1,699 and Kessler Park/Ravinia Heights has $500 for street sign toppers; and Kessler Neighbors Unlimited was awarded $1,700 for landscape lighting.

The neighborhoods have two years to use grant money for their projects, Mr. Burns said. When deciding who to fund, the grant committee looked at what other funding the neighborhoods had received for projects and whether projects helped preserve the look of the area. Applicants also had to be conservation league members.

"We don't totally fund any project," Mr. Burns said. "We ask that the neighborhood get involved in the additional funding."

David Haedge, president of the Winnetka Heights Neighborhood Association, said the grant money will help pay for a neighborhood directory that will list residents' names, hobbies and hometowns, in addition to giving the history of the neighborhood.

"It's a great way for the league to put money back into neighborhoods," Mr. Haedge said. "But it's not just physical beautification. It builds a neighborhood bond."

The league's annual home tour is the major fund-raising event that provides money for grants. The 17th annual Old Oak Cliff Fall Tour of Homes will be Oct. 16 and 17. Last year's event included 10 homes and one public building and attracted more than 2,000 people.

Patrick Boyd, tour chairman, said grant money allows old Oak Cliff residents to improve the area without depending solely on city funds.

"It's strictly about loving your neighborhood," Mr. Boyd said. "And there is really only so much the city can do."

Residents interested in volunteering for the home tour or willing to include their historic homes in the tour should call Mr. Boyd at 214-943-8147.