1990 Press Clippings About OOCCL
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Old Oak Cliff home tour and park festival is this weekend
The Dallas Morning News - Friday, September 21, 1990
Author: House & Garden staff: THE

Nine homes that epitomize the Oak Cliff lifestyle will be on display this weekend during The Old Oak Cliff Conservation League 's 1990 Home Tour and Park Festival.

The architecturally diverse houses range from a converted commercial space to a traditional 100-year-old gingerbread Victorian house with turrets and a wraparound porch.

The structures are located in the 13 renovation districts in North Oak Cliff including Winnetka Heights, Elmwood and Kessler Park.

Homes will be open from noon to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission to the tour and festival are $8.50 at the festival gate at Kidd Springs Park.

The festival, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, will feature a craft fair, children's games, food, drink and live entertainment. Tickets to the festival only are $1.50; children under 12 are admitted free.

For ticket and event information, call 948-63

Centennial Parade launches Oak Cliff home tour, festival
The Dallas Morning News - Sunday, September 23, 1990
Author: John Yearwood, Staff Writer of The Dallas Morning News: THE

It didn't take 7-year-old Phillip Keaton long to decide what he liked most in the Oak Cliff Centennial Parade on Saturday.

"I loved the army tanks and the guns,' said Phillip, waving an American flag as members of the Texas Army National Guard passed by.

The parade, which traveled through downtown Oak Cliff to Kidd Springs Park, was held to celebrate the community's founding and kick off the 16th Annual Old Oak Cliff Home Tour and Fall Festival. It was sponsored by the Jefferson Area Association and the Old Oak Cliff Conservation League .

About 2,000 people lined Jefferson Boulevard to watch the marchers.

"It was short, but it was nice,' said Pat Keaton, Phillip's mother, who had her 2-year-old daughter, Amy, and two friends in tow.

"It got us out of the house, and we are having fun together,' said Ms. Keaton, who lives in far southeast Dallas.

Almost 40 groups took part in the parade, including neighborhood associations, school bands and the Texas Army National Guard.

The National Guard contingent included an armored personnel carrier, a truck and a Tow Trak tank. The tank is similar to ones deployed in the Middle East, said Staff Sgt. Pedro Arriola.

"We do about 12 parades a year,' Sgt. Arriola said. "Not only are we a combat unit, we also do community service"

Foundation for Blind offers gift ideas
The Dallas Morning News - Wednesday, December 19, 1990
Author: Robert Miller:

... We hate to differ with Bill Minutaglio and Holly Williams (marital bookends) in the choice of the title of their new book, The Hidden City, Oak Cliff, Texas, but we thought there have been fewer high profile entities lately -- newswise and topographically -- in these environs.

But then again, what does a Philistine such as we know.

Anyone who has read any of Bill Minutaglio's love letters to that third of Big D on the other side of the Trinity, knows that Oak Cliff is a state of mind as well as a political and geographical unit.

Mr. Minutaglio, of course, is a staffer on The Dallas Morning News' Sunday magazine, Dallas Life. Ms. Williams is a dancer and choreographer.

The Hidden City, Oak Cliff, Texas has just been released, and to celebrate that event you're invited to a book signing from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Saturday at the Texas Theatre, 231 W. Jefferson.

The publishers are Elmwood Press and the Old Oak Cliff Conservation League ....

Staff columnist Robert Miller writes about people in the business community for The Dallas Morning News.